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Data Science Book Recommendations: A Crowdsourced List

By Emily Wilson • April 16, 2018

Last month, Metis Sr. Data Scientist and Corporate Trainer David Ziganto posted a simple question on LinkedIn along with a picture of his personal collection of data science books. "Here’s my fledgling data science library," he wrote. "Help me out: which great books am I missing?" Nearly 100 comments later, David now has an incredible list of additional books to add to his shelves. 

You can read through the original comments here, and/or you can check out David's related blog post here, which aggregates all the recommendations into categories like data cleaning, deep learning, machine learning, pedagogy, visualization, and many more.  It's a truly awesome list and resource for anyone at any stage of their data science learning journeys. 

But of course, we have to ask (because there's always room for additional learning!) – are there any books missing from the list? Let us know on Twitter @thisismetis


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